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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
by talking about ordinary europeans getting up and reading about the crisis of confidence in the eu, the lack of transparency and lack of democracy in brussels. he said this inevitably engendered notions like fear and dismay and the solution until frustration -- and frustration, so the real question was how to overcome this kind of emotions. as a former east german dissident, he said there is only one way to overcome those kinds of emotions and that is for people to get involved, to overcome indifference and complacency. on an economic front, it was interesting -- he admitted that germany has profited more than any other european country in the last 10 years of. he said other countries have been complaining about that i am quite an angry shape or form. he said the only question was not a german europe but a europeanized germany. people had high hopes that it would sort of reinvigorate the european mission. gauck has considerable rhetorical capabilities, but it was not a great speech, it was a good speech. it was dutiful. there were fireworks. i do not think he captured anyone's imagination to
. i know what that poll is saying, but i think there's a lot of confusion between the euro and the eu sometimes. i know that people think of the eurozone and the eu as sort of the same thing. >> the whole message from the conservative government has been a little confused. it's interesting and we'll play this a little later, but -- >> but they want to stay in the eu if they can negotiate new terms. you punish about there's a split in there because there will be one wing of the party that is essentially we want to stay and he are negotiate. the question comes is if they can't get everything they want, do they then say we tried, but we still better stay? a whole other wing of the party says, if we try and we don't get what we want, then we had better leave. >> and it's interesting. we asked earlier tr week about whether it would be bad for business if britain left the eu. actually, he seemed to say yes. in every the less, i think he serves in some capacity with the government, as well. he hesitated a little bit and says, well, yes, we'll play that tape. >> and how many other people actu
for italy's election. we'll get a check on europe's growth process spengts for the eu forecast. we'll head live to brussels for a live press conference. in other news, boeing is set to unveil a plan to help its troubled dreamliner to take flight today. and we're rolling out the red carpet. we'll head to tinsel town to the biggest night in hollywood. find out which films are tipped to win big at this year's oscars. fears are mounting that an inconclusive election this weekend could undermine the euro and set back markets in italy. hans, as we edge closer to that event, polls open sunday and they close on monday. we've seen the two-day sell off. is it related to the outcome here? >> well, i think the italian election has had an impact on market performance for the past few weeks. i guess that markets became much more cautious in investing in the debt market in italy and maybe as well as the debt market in spain, the cause of the potential inflation risk here. now, if we are getting an election result which markets may like, then the very clear majority left and under those circumstances, you
to continue risky behavior. hi bonuses have since become a very contentious topics. the eu is currently working on plans to limit banker bonuses. it would be a historic first. a swiss politician also launched an initiative a few years ago. he was fed up with the high bonuses paid to managers in switzerland's top companies. now swiss voters will decide if stockholders of companies will be able to determine how much money managers get. >> if -- is thomas a modern-day william tell or simply obsessed with revenge? for months, the 49-year-old businessman has been promoting his initiative to tighten controls on executive compensation with countless speeches, debates, and interviews. 16 hours a day he is in the fight of his life. >> the debate in assembly's committee, blocks have been phenomenal. it is a real pleasure to have the swiss system of direct democracy and to use it as an individual. >> it began in 2001 when swiss air was ounded. for the swissthe bankruptcy of their debt-ridden national carrier was traumatic. in the company's last ceo -- then the company's last ceo took home some 10
to pay off the interest on the bed and italy having to ask for a bailout the eu and eurozone have to -- cannot afford. but we are still a ways from that. we are not seeing the interest that we saw at the end of the berlusconi era. the markets -- the markets are cautious but as soon as there is some idea what will happen politically, the better. >> live in rome. the uncertainty in italy has worried eurozone politicians who had been pleased about the cuts and tax rises mario monti's government put into place to control the country's economy. >> it is not my role to comment or put myself in the place of italian electors. we need a strong italy, european italy. and italy that is reforming itself and taking its rightful place in the orchestra of change your europe needs. >> it is important that italy not only in the interest of italy but in the interests of all europe will soon form a stable and functioning government. it is important for italy and because italy is such an important country in europe, olive europe that a stable and functioning government is formed. r inut governor of l
a speech. i'd love to know what they're going to say bearing in mind that they're not exactly pro eu parliament. so that will be fascinating, won't it? let's face it, anti-austerity was the theme of this. bearing in mind, we've got 50% of voters coming around to say grillo or berlusconi, we don't want aus tearpy. anyway, the bill fall guy in this election was the prime minister, the technocrat who ran, marto monte. let's hear what he's been saying in the aftermath of these electoral disaster. >> translator: it's still too early to consider any solution, nor does it rest upon me to find one. but right now, i consider it is essential that there's maximum transparency between the political forces because we're all faced with a very serious responsibility. the government must ensure responsibility for the entire country. >> okay. so more analysis. alana fred reeko joins us now. you've had a big meeting today already, loradonna. you shook my hand. lovely. thank you. no one else did today. what did you guys decide is the way forward? >> following the outcome of the italian election, the si
the eu or china somehow swallowing up every bit of innovation that exists in the world. they're no longer, i think, worried about our -- our economy being overwhelmed beyond our shores. stuart: a little awkward on the timing there and finally, ben bernanke will give his update on the economy to congress today. is he going to keep printing money to make up for the dire spending cuts that could start friday or to protect the economy against europe? what's he going to do? is he going to keep printing money or not? we'll be here right at ten o'clock to find out exactly what he's going to do. it will affect the market. all right, next, we're following up on the big story, the big stock selloff and ask, why do the italians have such a big impact on our money and plus, the governor of kansas, we'll ask sam brownback his push to eliminate the income tax. and i've got good news on housing, too. ♪ [ cows moo ] [ sizzling ] more rain... [ thunder rumbles ] ♪ [ male announcer ] when the world moves... futures move first. learn futures from experienced pros with dedicated chats and daily live webi
.s. democratic process, take a look at italy. its election debacle threatens to unleash the e.u. debt crisis once again. should the u.s. brace for impact? we'll explain it. do you ever have too much money? ♪ ♪ . melissa: this is a big topic this week whether companies should allow employees to work from home. obviously yahoo!'s marisa meyer started the dialogue with her bombshell announcement starting in june all employees will be expected to show up at the office or else find work somewhere else. this is controversial move generating heat what is best for the company's bottom line. is working from home progress or is it unproductive? joining me now with both side, are hadley heath from the independent women's forum and republican strategist know well knicks pour. -- noell nikpour. welcome to the show. this is interesting test case for the rest of the economy. this is standing up saying listen, this is okay, if you're not here, i don't know what you're doing. i don't know you're not doing. you're n not talking to people in the hallways. there are actual meetings and something beneficial from
north korea about its nuclear weapon program. he said there will be talks with the e.u. about reaching a transatlantic trade agreement. and marco rubio gave the republican response and criticized obama's programs and proposals as more unnecessary deficit spending. joining us for more, head of european g-10 fx bank of america merrill lynch. welcome. >> good morning. >> want to start talking about europe, about cypress where he got back from. first the u.s. dollar, what's happening with the potential fiscal talks. how concerned are you, what does it moon for trading the currency? >> the u.s. dollar has weakened so far this year because of the overall market risk move that we have seen. positive of surprises in the u.s. at the global level. and looking forward, we were bullish on the u.s. dollar because we see a market correction as the u.s. tightens fiscal policy substantially this year. >> how severe of a correction might that -- >> we believe for the rest of the year the euro/dollar will be closer to 1.30 or below, 1.35. >> really? >> also last week we believe in the way there's a ceil
of the bulge names in part because of the eu risk is higher in those. how serious do you take a day like today on that front? >> well, our biggest concern really is the continued unstable nature of greece. i think spain and italy will be fine as long as greece doesn't create a chain reaction, which i think it will. and i'm still very concerned about what is going on there. but as you guys pointed out, you know, you came into early 10, early 11, early 12 and felt good, trends were good and the eu kind of put the kibosh on ceo confidence and capital markets activity. i'm concerned about that. >> you seem less worried. >> we're more worried about the u.s. economy. i think what we're seeing now in the marketplace makes sense. we had the megabanks lead the rally late last year. we recently have switched to the regional banks outperforming the megabanks and now we're getting that normal consolidation period which is to be expected. look at the ten-year treasury yield, that's what we say. if above ten for first quarter -- above 2% for first quarter, then earnings estimates will probably go higher. wh
. >> you're invited over here. >> we have scotland and then we will have the eu probably about 16 or 17 after the next -- >> i've invited you to be the 51st state over here. >> that's all you will be over here. >> you try to tax us without representation, we'll try to -- >> it's a good number. >> martin b what do you think about the referendum? >> i got myself into trouble by saying that it increases uncertainty. it's what i called the fifth grace one and so there's more uncertainty now. from a political point of view, there's -- >> because of the referendum? right. the prime minister made the right decision. the uk sort of right wing party, it liked the tea party, i guess, in some respects has gained 16% of the vote according to the polls. take more from the trres or from labor. so i think the prime minister was concerned about that. having a referendum laid it out. we did some polling, online polling after the speech. they thought the referendum was right. content of the speech was good, they would vote for the coming out of. there's a lot of work to be done until we get to the refere
some of the things necessary to live up to their commitment to the eu. does this throw a wrench into the works? >> i think we should be thinking about it. the somewhat untold story is that -- >> you heard of this guy before this? >> absolutely. >> was he funny. >> he's funny. it would be a little bit like -- >> jackie mason? >> no -- >> seinfeld. >> robin williams or somebody. he was big in the '80s this guy. he also has been a big part of the political satire, all the rest of it. very, very bright guy. but you know, it's almost an a listic party. it's july real just truly a protest vote. to my knowledge it's gotten over 25% of the vote, the latest thing i've seen. monti is the best of the best. i honestly believe that is one of the, you know, on democracies it's easier to give stuff away. >> two years ago he had just started and i asked why are these pictures of monti in a beach chair. and they all said send monti to the beach. that was two years ago. >> yeah, he's only been in there a group -- grillo is moving. five-star movement is only three years old. it's a very organized,
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)